Productivity and GTD

Productivity is about YOU

AUTHOR: Francisco Sáez
Blog productivity

There are people who live in an eternal pursuit of productivity. They read books and articles related to the topic to learn new methods and techniques, they try things out, and they keep themselves aware of the most current technological devices available.

And the truth is that all this is fine. I do these things, too. But the key word here is eternal. You should try to improve a system when it is necessary; when is not, it is simply a waste of time. And when you begin devoting time and effort to things that aren’t really essential, all this obsessive activity becomes counter-productive, which, interestingly, goes against the reason that originally created the interest to begin with.

Let’s see if I can explain this differently: To be really productive you have to stop thinking about productivity.

If your working system forces you to be aware of the system itself, you will be continuously wasting energy on it that you should be using on other things. As much as you like, a system that requires a lot of work does not work. Your system should free you, not enslave you. You should be dedicated to thinking, doing, creating, devising, working, not messing around with some productivity-improvement program.

The less you need to think about your personal productivity system, the more effective it is. If you have to worry everyday to copy some data from here to there, to use some gimmicky solutions to perform certain processes, to adapt your software to your particular needs, this is simply bad business.

The objective of a personal productivity system—the combination of the methods, techniques, and tools you use to manage your stuff—should be to become a smoothly functioning, beneficial aspect of your life and then disappear from your consciousness right away. It should simply become a part of your everyday life, not something you have to consciously think through all the time. It’s already complicated enough to build the habits necessary to be productive and efficient.

Some systems may work well when you have only a few tasks or under certain circumstances, but fail miserably when your activity level increases or circumstances change. In this case, yes, you must find new solutions. But before thinking about whether your method or your application is failing, ask yourself honestly, is it me who is failing?

It’s tempting to obsess with new methods and new tools. So much so that you will never be productive. You will only be productive if you become obsessed with what you are supposed to do with those tools. As the people at 37signals say in their book Rework, “you can buy the same guitar, effects pedals, and amplifier that Eddie Van Halen uses, but when you play that rig, it’s still going to sound like you”.

Your gear does not determine your productivity. Neither your software. Not your boss, your colleagues, or your family. Not even the methodology you use. Although these things undoubtedly can help, only you are capable of achieving true productivity.

To start with, you need a working system with which you are comfortable—one that doesn’t generate extra work—so that building and maintaining habits will be easier. You need a workflow, method and tools that can all be set on automatic, running quietly, smoothly, and efficiently. And once you find something that works, look no further.

If you liked this article, you may be interested in our ebook “The Pursuit of Mastery”, of it is part. You can purchase it in Kindle, iPad, Nook and PDF formats on the Hyperink website at the price of $4.95, or directly to your Kindle on Amazon.com.

No comments

Posts are closed to new comments after 30 days.

Try FacileThings FREE for 30 DAYS and start living at your own pace

No credit card required for the free trial. Cancel anytime with one click.